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Colloquium: Ivy Hauser (University of Texas Arlington)

Anna Papafragou head shot
October 6, 2023
3:55PM - 5:30PM
Oxley 103

Date Range
2023-10-06 15:55:00 2023-10-06 17:30:00 Colloquium: Ivy Hauser (University of Texas Arlington) When does perceptual normalization affect phonetic convergence? People unconsciously shift their pronunciation towards speech they hear. This can be observed gradually over the course of years in a new environment, but small shifts also occur spontaneously within a few minutes of exposure. While tendency towards convergence is well-established, most existing work cannot determine how this interacts with perceptual normalization to different talkers. In other words, do people converge towards how a speaker talks, including the linguistic patterns they exhibit, or the raw acoustics of their voice? This talk uses English sibilants as a test case and presents multiple lab studies of /s/ and /sh/ convergence. Results indicate that most speakers converge towards raw acoustics and these shifts are not constrained by phonological category boundaries. This has implications for theories of speech sound representation, the perception-production link, and second language pedagogy. Accommodation statement: If you require an accommodation such as live captioning or interpretation to participate in this event, please contact Dan Parker (parker.1758@osu.edu). In general, requests made two weeks before the event will allow us to provide seamless access, but the university will make every effort to meet requests made after this date.  Oxley 103 Department of Linguistics linguistics@osu.edu America/New_York public

When does perceptual normalization affect phonetic convergence?

People unconsciously shift their pronunciation towards speech they hear. This can be observed gradually over the course of years in a new environment, but small shifts also occur spontaneously within a few minutes of exposure. While tendency towards convergence is well-established, most existing work cannot determine how this interacts with perceptual normalization to different talkers. In other words, do people converge towards how a speaker talks, including the linguistic patterns they exhibit, or the raw acoustics of their voice? This talk uses English sibilants as a test case and presents multiple lab studies of /s/ and /sh/ convergence. Results indicate that most speakers converge towards raw acoustics and these shifts are not constrained by phonological category boundaries. This has implications for theories of speech sound representation, the perception-production link, and second language pedagogy.

Accommodation statement: If you require an accommodation such as live captioning or interpretation to participate in this event, please contact Dan Parker (parker.1758@osu.edu). In general, requests made two weeks before the event will allow us to provide seamless access, but the university will make every effort to meet requests made after this date. 

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